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Looking for Lincoln

Bloomington-Normal is one of the richest communities for Abraham Lincoln-related sites—some of which look much as they did during his lifetime! There are 12 Looking for Lincoln markers in the Twin Cities, many a short walk from the Museum. Hear Lincoln tell you about each one virtually from here!

Looking for Lincoln Logo
From these markers you can...

  • View the Phoenix Block, including the actual building where Jesse Fell convinced Lincoln to run for president.
  • Admire David Davis' downtown law office where Lincoln and other Eighth Circuit attorneys handled correspondence and casework.
  • Learn more about the 1836 McLean County Courthouse where Lincoln practiced law for over two decades.
  • Take in the site of Major's Hall where Lincoln delivered a fiery address opposing slavery's expansion at a convention to organize the Illinois Republican Party.
  • Stand next to city lots once owned by William “Billy the Barber” de Fleurville, an African American friend of Lincoln’s.
  • Visit the David Davis Mansion State Historic Site to learn more about the longtime Eighth Circuit judge who Lincoln appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • See the location of the Illinois Central depot to learn more about Lincoln’s extensive legal work for this railroad.
  • Stop at the site of Jesse Fell's home in Normal where Lincoln was a frequent visitor.
Railroad depot with six or seven railroads, showing a town on the left, and cars on the tracks while people walk around.

The Illinois Central Railroad depot , circa 1860.

Railroad depot with six or seven railroads, showing a town on the left, and cars on the tracks while people walk around.
Black and white drawing of a large building with multiple businesses and people walking by.

Bloomington’s North Street (now Monroe), just north of the Courthouse Square, circa 1860.

Black and white drawing of a large building with multiple businesses and people walking by.
Two story courthouse with a large cupola and men gathered out front.

McLean County’s Lincoln era courthouse, circa 1855.

Two story courthouse with a large cupola and men gathered out front.
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